Bolivia 2: Tropical Bass Takes Over

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Ignore your phone. Throw on your kicks. Slide on your mask. And get ready to move, drink, and indulge in some serious fun at the hottest monthly after-hours party in Paraguay.

Ping. The text we’ve been waiting for has arrived: the address of the Bolivia 2 party, a monthly underground party that’s mashing up tropical bass like no other. (About that name, yes, the party takes place in Paraguay. Yes, the name is Bolivia 2.0. It’s a tribute to our neighbors to the North, try not to get confused, OK?)

Created by street artist and DJ Lucas We and co-hosted by illustrator and street artist Oz Montania, this is the invite everyone can't wait to receive. Details are sent by text a few hours before the party starts-that way it stays underground and limited to about 300 people.

Bolivia 2 features five of the fiercest DJs from Paraguay and Argentina, who mix everything from old cumbia tracks to psychedelic Peruvian pop to hip-hop. The party is unleashed at 23:00 and continues past sunrise. You may never party the same way again.

When the clock strikes midnight, we head over to Asuncion barrio of Villa Morra. This month, the party is in someone's backyard (last time it was at the beach), and the theme is Carnaval. For 9 straights hours, our ears explode and we can't stop moving as DJs spin a tripped-out party track.

Have we mentioned the costumes? For each party a local group-the Bolivian Ladies-creates bold costumes, masks, and hats. Just grab one on your way in to join the fun. 

As the sun comes up, Oz tells us that Lucas was inspired to create Bolivia 2 because "There wasn't any place you could go and hear and dance to everything. It was so predictable. You would go to a bar and it's the house music you hear in Berlin or the electronic music you hear in Ibiza. It was time to do something dope."

And with that, he hands us a beer and spins another tropical bass song that gets us hooked. We couldn't stop moving if we tried.

Photos courtesty of Sara Mohazzebi.

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